THE FORECAST

It may be that I dreamed a dream; it may be that I saw
The forecast of a time to come, by some supernal law.
I seemed to dwell in this same world, and in this modern time;
All strife had ceased; men were disarmed; and quiet Peace had made
A thousand avenues for toil, in place of War's crime trade.
From east to west, from north to south, where highways smooth and broad
Tied State to State, the waste lands bloomed, like garden spots of God.
There were no beggars in the streets; there were no unemployed;
For each man owned his plot of ground, and laboured and enjoyed.
Sweet children grew like garden flowers; all strong and fair to see;
And when I marvelled at the sight, thus spake a Voice to me:
'All Motherhood is now an art, the greatest art on earth;
And nowhere is there known the crime of one unwelcome birth.
From rights of parentage the sick and sinful are debarred;
For Matron Science keeps our house, and at the door stands guard.
We know the cure for darkness lies in letting in the light;
And Prisons are replaced by Schools, where wrong views change to right.
The wisdom, knowledge, study, thought, once bent on beast and sod,
We give now to the human race, the highest work of God;
And, as the gardener chooses seed, so we select with care;
And as our Man Plant grows, we give him soil and sun and air.
There are no slums; no need of alms; all men are opulent,
For Mother Earth belongs to them, as was the First Intent.'

It may be that I dreamed a dream; it may be that I saw
The forecast of a time to come, by some supernal law.

Poems of Problems. By Ella Wheeler Wilcox
London : Gay and Hancock, 1914.


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